All the Missing Girls

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Nicolette Farrell is back in Cooley Ridge, North Carolina for the first time in ten years. As a teenagers, Nic, Beth, and Corinne tore up their small town. They were always taking risks, causing trouble, and the rumor was that they swapped boyfriends sometimes. Those wild, carefree days came to an abrupt end when Corrine disappeared. After her disappearance, Nic moved away from everything she knew to start a new life. Now Nic’s father is ailing, and her brother has called her back to help sell their father’s house. But soon after Nic returns, another young girl goes missing.

The gimmick of this thriller is that it is told backwards. There are few chapters in “present time” to orient the reader, but then the story skips ahead a couple of weeks. From then on, each chapter tells about the previous day’s events. So, after the first few chapters, we start on Day 15. The next chapter is Day 14, then 13, 12, etc. Slowly everything is revealed about Nic, her past, Corinne’s disappearance, and the new disappearance Nic is present for. This is a creative way to organize the plot, but I felt that the execution was imperfect. I am not saying I could do better, but as a reader, it was sometimes a bit hard to keep things chronologically in my mind when the book/plot was going backwards. Beyond that, there was not anything too special about this thriller. It did the small town mysterious vibe very well though.

Organizational choices aside, how was the rest of the novel? It was OK. There were a good number of twists, and some caught me by surprise. There were quite a few secondary characters that matter to the plot. They are written well enough to not be confused with each other, but none of them stand out. I had to look up some of the characters’ names (including the main character’s) even though I only read the book a week ago. No one was very memorable.

Some of the conflicts in the novel made me frustrated. I am beginning to really hate when characters have disagreements that are easily solved by simply communicating. I realize that miscommunication happens a lot in real life, but sometimes these characters (mainly Nic) would neglect to tell another character something important, only to have it come back to bite them in the ass later or it created some misunderstanding that could easily have been prevented. Nic is a character that has a lot of secrets, but I could not always get behind her actions and decision-making. Still, she was not as frustrating as the main character in The Woman in Cabin 10

So, yes, this was a very “OK” read. It was nothing too special, but I did blow through the first half of the book in one day. Of course, it took me about a week to pick it back up again and finish it. If you would like to read a small town domestic thriller with a uniquely organized plot, you might want to try All the Missing Girls.

The Woman in Cabin 10

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I love mystery/thriller novels, but I realized I had read all of mine on my to-be-read shelf. This led me to discover a little app called Scribd where I could download and rent audiobooks, ebooks, and magazines for a small, monthly fee (less than Audible with unlimited books, not sponsored of course). Since I was also going on a 12 hour drive, I decided I needed something audible and suspenseful to keep me awake. I had never read anything by Ruth Ware before, but I knew she had been getting some buzz about her novels. So, I chose The Woman in Cabin 10.

Laura “Lo” Blacklock gets a chance report on an exclusive cruise ship for the magazine she has been working at for several years. This could be her big chance to make a name for herself as well as schmooze with rich and influential people. The perks of getting on the luxurious cruise with a press pass don’t hurt either. Lo is installed in cabin nine of the small cruise ship. Before the first night’s dinner on the cruise, Lo meets a strange young woman in the next door cabin– cabin 10. Lo continues with her night of drinking and getting acquainted with the rich and famous passengers, but she never sees the woman from cabin 10 at dinner. When Lo finally lays down to sleep, she hears a scream and a splash from the direction of cabin ten’s balcony. Lo reports what she has heard to the crew, but… no one is registered to cabin 10 and no passenger or crew member is missing.

I liked quite a few things about this novel, but in the end it was a middle-of-the-road read. I liked the closed setting of the cruise ship in the cold sea. The writing was not extremely descriptive, but it set the tone and atmosphere very well. The suspense built at a steady pace until around the halfway point. After perhaps 60-70% of the book, things began to fall apart for me. Up until that point, the plot felt like a very entertaining nod to an Agatha Cristie novel. Then, well… things got weird.

Let’s back up a bit. My main dislike throughout the novel was our main character, Lo. The novel is told from her first-person perspective, so we get into her mind a lot. Despite being in her head, she made some odd decisions that I could not understand her logic for. At one point, Lo is scared and alone in her apartment at night. She has had a traumatic experience with a burglar earlier that day, and everyone makes a point to tell her that burglars commonly return to a place they have burgled before. Understandably, she cannot sleep, but she decides it is a good idea to leave her house with its repaired and improved door locks while in her pajamas after midnight and walk around the city. There are also a few smaller examples of her questionable decision making, like the instances when she gets drunk even though she says, repeatedly, that she should not. She does very little research on the cruise when it is supposedly a career making opportunity. She is assaulted by a man, but cries on his shoulder in the next scene. There were multiple instances of me yelling at the audiobook for her to do something. At times, Lo is frustratingly passive about what is happening around her.

My favorite part of a novel like this is getting to know the side characters and guessing who the bad guys are. The Woman in Cabin 10 did this for a bit, but as I said, near the end it lost its way. The climax felt sudden, and the resolution did not make a lot of sense. Again, Lo made some odd decisions. She trusted people she should not and told other people things she should not. She did not listen to explicit advice from other characters. It is stated that she has depression and anxiety (and perhaps a drinking problem), but that does not explain her lack of logical thinking and carelessness.

The Woman in Cabin 10 was entertaining, but it was not without its issues. I enjoyed the audiobook itself. It was read very well, but Lo’s character made me want to tear my hair out. I rated The Woman in Cabin 10 a respectable three out of five stars.